UK enforces law which bans public from criticising the govt

lawLast year we exposed how the Justice and Security Bill gives British courts the mandate to hold both criminal – and civil – cases in private and prevent suspects from hearing the evidence against them. It also enhances the powers of the Intelligence and Security Committee – which was established by the Intelligence Services Act in 1994.

It effectively makes them exempt from having to supply documents under the Freedom of Information Act and extends their right to conduct surveillance on the internet.

Suspects who have been excluded from secret court proceedings would be represented by a ‘special advocate’ – a security cleared lawyer chosen by the government or prosecutor, who is appointed on their behalf.

At the end of court hearing, the person being tried may win or lose their case without knowing why, as the court’s reasoning will likely be “classified”.

In fact, suspects don’t even have to be told there is a trial taking place against them, until they are arrested by police to begin their prison sentence. The legislation effectively marked the start of tyranny and ‘disappearing’ in the UK, which is usually seen in countries like North Korea or Zimbabwe.

Last year, we revealed how new laws were being introduced to allow for the use of secret courts in the UK for criminal and civil cases. The law effectively makes it “legal” to hold a court case against someone without their knowledge, detain them and penalise them – without telling them why, and without giving them access to a lawyer.

Read the full story [HERE]

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